Launching
awareness
raising
initiatives

 


 

Guiding principle
 

The standards recommend (inter-) national sport organisations and public authorities to encourage awareness on the topic of sexual violence against children in sport among the public, sport staff, athletes, and parents.

It is recommended to develop awareness raising campaigns and inform athletes about their rights. Awareness raising initiatives should include information on the existence and complexity of sexual violence in sport, basic information on facts and figures, as well as risk factors and impact.

Why? Breaking the taboo, sharing the knowledge, discussing the topic, building the understanding, changing the attitude and prompting action on sexual violence against children in sport.

 

Tips from PSS+ partners and experts when starting with awareness raising initiatives

 

  1. Clarify who the target audience is and tailor the awareness raising materials to it.
  2. Stay away from messages that put responsibility on the child or stereotypes, and avoid using negative, judgmental or scaremongering messages.  The wording should be carefully chosen.
  3. Use short and easy to understand messages that can be spread using social media (e.g. Violence concerns us all / all is responsible / all can help to stop it, No violence is justified (play by the rules), It is not the victim’s fault, Keep sport safe / preserve sport values, Sport can help to protect children).
  4. Use daily life situations / cases that can be easily understandable and recognisable.
  5. Encourage openness and provide direction on how to disclose.
  6. Communicate about concrete actions that sport stakeholders can take (e.g. information on support services, helplines, etc.).
  7. Publicise initiatives.
  8. Discuss your ideas and actions within your organisation: raising awareness is a collective responsibility!
  9. Consult with relevant stakeholders to make sure initiatives are in line with demographics (e.g. athletes, children, coaches) and involve children and young athletes in the development of awareness raising initiatives.
  10. Develop training and educational programs, dedicated to coaches, sport leaders, PE teachers, volunteers, children, high performance athletes, parents, etc. Awareness raising campaigns should be in tandem with training and educational programs.

Examples of practices and initiatives

Allowed to care, allowed to intervene guide

Organisation responsible: Finnish Olympic Committee

Target groups of the practice:  Adults in sport, including parents, coaches, instructors, sport club leaders, and others with responsibility for children and young people’s sport.

Abstract: “Allowed to Care, Allowed to Intervene: A Guide for Adults on Sexual Harassment and Abuse in Sport” was the first guide in Finland on the prevention and management of sexual harassment and child abuse in sport. It aims to increase stakeholders’ knowledge and understanding of sexual harassment and child abuse in sport. The guide defines sexual harassment and abuse in sport, explains the principles underpinning adult-child athlete interactions and appropriate coach-child athlete relationships, and offers guidelines for individuals and sports clubs on the development of ethical sports culture. It also provides information on the mechanisms for managing suspected sexual harassment, abuse or other unethical behaviour, and includes an educational tool for identifying and raising awareness on various forms of sexual harassment and abuse in sport.

Timeframe: 2002 - on going

More information available at: Downloading the Guide: https://storage.googleapis.com/valo-production/2017/06/lupa-valittaa-lupa-puuttua-2017.pdf

 Detailed description of the project (in English)

Contact person: Elina Laine - Finnish Olympic Committee

Coaches’ inappropriate behaviour (video)

Organisation responsible: National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC) and Child Protection in Sport Unit (CPSU), United Kingdom

Target groups of the practice:  Safeguarding staff, sports coaches, other volunteers, parents

Abstract: Does your sports team or club have clear guidelines on appropriate behaviour for a coach? This video clip will help anyone involved in sports activities with children and young people including coaches, volunteer helpers, activity organisers, management committees, participants and parents.

Timeframe: On going

More information available at:  http://thecpsu.org.uk/resource-library/2013/coaches-inappropriate-behaviour/  

Contact

From BORDERLINE to CRYSTAL CLEAR - Website

Organisation responsible: The Swedish Agency for Youth and Civil Society (Myndigheten för ungdoms- och civilsamhällsfrågor, or MUCF)

Target groups of the practice:  NGOs, associations, sport organisations and religious communities offering organised child and youth activities.

Abstract: “From borderline to crystal clear” is a website where information on sexual harassment and abuse of children in NGOs is collated to help raise awareness on the issue and provide information and support for NGOs,  including youth sports coaches on implementing prevention measures. The website is divided into two sections, which include information from a variety of stakeholders (e.g. from victims, from the legal sector, from academia): 1) ‘Why?’, which covers why sexual violence and abuse occur in NGOs and the reasons to why associations should implement prevention measures, as well as providing tools to help identify sexual violence and abuse in sport, and 2) ‘How?’, which discusses ways of preventing and managing sexual violence and abuse in associations that offers organised activities for children and youth such as many sports associations, giving examples of awareness-raising initiatives and approaches to managing incidences in organised child and youth activities. As such, the website serves as a hub for information on sexual violence and abuse in NGOs offering organised child and youth activities. The Salvation Army, organisations from the women’s shelter movement, and the scout movement, have also begun to provide links to the “From borderline to crystal clear” website.

Timeframe: 2013 - 2014

More information available at: Website of the project (in Swedish): http://www.granser.nu/ [Note that the website might be closed in 2018]

 Detailed description of the project (in English)

Contact person: Cecilia Narby - Swedish Agency for Youth and Civil Society

Guide for the prevention of sexual harassment in sport in the Czech Republic

Organisation responsible: Czech National Olympic Committee

Target groups of the practice: Sport federations, clubs and schools

Abstract: In 2006, following a first, ground-breaking study on gender-based violence in sport in the Czech Republic (2002-2005), the National Olympic Committee developed a guide on the prevention of sexual harassment in sport. This guide was translated and adapted from a similar Finnish document. It constitutes a pedagogical effort to raise awareness on a variety of real-life situations where sexual harassment and rape occur. The guide adopts the perspective of the victim, stressing that while harassment will not necessarily be perceived as such by the perpetrator and/or the surrounding of the victim, the perspective of the latter should prevail. It was widely disseminated to 5,000 sport federations, clubs and schools, the guide provided all categories of sport agents with a broad definition of (sexual) harassment, illustrated through real-life situations. Awareness-raising actions have been organised by the Czech Olympic Committee throughout the country to support the guide’s dissemination.

Timeframe: 2006 - 2016

More information available at: Downloading the Guide (in Czech): http://www.olympic.cz/upload/files/g9vmztko05-prevence-sex-obtezovani.pdf

 Detailed description of the project (in English)

Contact person: Naděžda Knorre - Committee of Equal Opportunities in Sport, Czech Olympic Committee

I saw your willy - Be Share Aware (video)

Organisation responsible: National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC), United Kingdom

Target groups of the practice:  Safeguarding staff, sports coaches, other volunteers, parents

Abstract: We tell our children it’s good to share – but online it’s different. In fact sometimes it can be dangerous. That’s why we’re asking parents to be Share Aware – and keep children safe online.

Find out more here: NSPCC

Timeframe: On going

More information available at:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sch_WMjd6go

Contact

Making Noise: children and young people’s voices after sexual abuse (video)

Organisation responsible: National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC), United Kingdom

Target groups of the practice:  Safeguarding staff, sports coaches, other volunteers, parents, young people

Abstract: Making Noise puts the focus on children and young people’s voices for positive change after sexual abuse. It is a project produced by The International Centre, University of Bedfordshire, in collaboration with the NSPCC.
The Office of the Children’s Commissioner commissioned the original report. Read the full report at https://www.beds.ac.uk/ic/recently-completed-projects/making-noise

Timeframe: On going

More information available at:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2-MStSRnQmo

Contact

My magic sports kit (video)

Organisation responsible: National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC) and Child Protection in Sport Unit (CPSU), United Kingdom

Target groups of the practice:  Safeguarding staff, sports coaches, other volunteers, parents, young people

Abstract: In this video, children describe how parents' and spectators' behaviour gets worse during competitions – and how this affects the young athletes.

Timeframe: On going

More information available at:  http://thecpsu.org.uk/resource-library/2013/my-magic-sports-kit/  

Contact

Preventing child sexual abuse (video)

Organisation responsible: National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC), United Kingdom

Target groups of the practice:  Safeguarding staff, sports coaches, other volunteers, parents

Abstract: This animation explores simple steps we can all take to make children safer.

Timeframe: On going

More information available at:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UbtSJCw_lqw  

Contact

Sexual Harassment and Abuse in Sport: Interactive tool (e-learning)

Organisation responsible: International Olympic Committee (IOC)

Target groups of the practice:  Athletes, athletes’ entourage members

Abstract: This interactive educational tool provides examples of what may constitute harassment and abuse in sport using case studies depicted through nine interactive video clips.

Timeframe: On going

More information available at: http://sha.olympic.org/home.html See also: https://hub.olympic.org/library/safe-sport/ and https://hub.olympic.org/safeguarding/resource-library/

Contact

Sport respects your rights

Organisation responsible: “Sport respects your rights (SRYR)” was coordinated by SPORTUNION Austria, the European Non-Governmental Sports Organisation (ENGSO Youth), and the German Sports University Cologne; developed in the framework of the DAPHNE III funding programme. It was implemented by eight partner organisations from six different countries: Austria (Austrian Athletics Federation, and SPORTUNION Austria), Germany (DJK Youth, and German Sports Youth), Italy (Italian Aerobic and Fitness Federation), the Netherlands (the Dutch Olympic Committee and Sports Federation, or NOC*NSF), Poland (Campaign Against Homophobia), and the United Kingdom (Edge Hill University)

Target groups of the practice: Local organisations or groups; adults and youth multipliers, and young people

Abstract: Sport Respects Your Rights (SRYR) was a transnational EU-funded project ran by a consortium of eight partners representing Austria, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, and the UK. The goal of SRYR was to prevent and combat gender-based violence in youth sport and develop a culture of respect in sport. SRYR adopted an empowerment approach to encourage young people aged 16-22 years old to reflect on, act and protect themselves against gender-based violence in and through sport. Young people in each partner country were given a platform to develop their own campaigns through which they raised awareness on gender-based violence among peers in and beyond sport. This participatory process allowed young people to become active agents of social change. The youth-led campaigns incorporated workshops on preventing gender-based violence for young people in sport, and designing and distributing awareness-raising videos and posters. Each project partner also developed a multi-sector network to create long-lasting synergies to fight gender-based violence in sport.

Timeframe: 2013 - 2015

More information available at: “Sport Respects Your Rights” webpage: http://sport-respects-your-rights.eu/

 Detailed description of the project (in English)

Contact person: Alexandra Hoffmann - SPORTUNION Austria

Underwear rule – keeping deaf children safe from abuse (video)

Organisation responsible: National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC), United Kingdom

Target groups of the practice:  Safeguarding staff, sports coaches, other volunteers, parents

Abstract: This is a version of our Underwear Rule guide to help protect deaf children from abuse. Find out more about the Underwear Rule here: https://www.nspcc.org.uk/preventing-abuse/keeping-children-safe/underwear-rule/

Timeframe: On going

More information available at:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lvD74L86Mr8

Contact