Developing educational programmes

 


 

             © F. ZVARDON

 

Guiding principle
 

Educating stakeholders on the existence, risk factors, characteristics and impact is a key action in primary prevention of sexual violence in sport.

The normative standards emphasize the need for special education or training programmes on the topic of sexual violence against children for sport leaders and PE teachers, for child athletes (adapted to their evolving capacity) and all other stakeholders in sport. Training should be regularly organised and developed in collaboration with academics.

 

Tips from PSS+ partners and experts when starting with educational programmes

 

  1. An educational program on sexual violence needs to be included in the general educational program for coaches, sport leaders, sport managers, PE teachers, etc.
  2. Educational programs should include information on the definition and examples of sexual violence, on the relevant legal framework, on prevention and protection, on reporting and referral systems.
  3. Confront your audience with the voices of survivors in sport.
  4. Use experts in relevant fields, e.g. psychologists, child protection experts, etc.
  5. Target sport leaders, sport managers and coaches (at federation and club level), students in sport sciences, athletes, volunteers, PE teachers, welfare officers and parents (especially for promising young athletes).
  6. Clarify who your target group is, and prepare tailored educational materials.  Trainings need to be arranged and tailored to specific roles and responsibilities (e.g. trainings on investigations for welfare officer).
  7. Use an interactive, results-oriented approach, and if targeting children, make sure to use a child-friendly format (e.g. open discussion).
  8. Use new media (webinars, online tutorials, social media and apps) but also consider that including face-to-face information is crucial, acknowledging the fact that the topic of sexual violence is sensitive.
  9. Install an accreditation system for sport organisations to stimulate the participation of staff.
  10.  Built-in support for people who may be affected by training / education.
  11. Train the trainers who are responsible for the educational programs for coaches, sport leaders, managers, etc.

Examples of practices and initiatives

Athlete Safeguarding Course: Athlete Learning Gateway (e-learning)

Organisation responsible: International Olympic Committee (IOC)

Target groups of the practice:  Athletes, athletes’ entourage members

Abstract: This free, bite-sized course for athletes and athletes’ entourage members, delivered by Dr Margo Mountjoy and Mr Sheldon Kennedy, provides an overview of the core components of athlete safeguarding.

Participants of this course can obtain a certificate for achieving “gold” in this course.

Timeframe: On going

More information available at:  http://onlinecourse.olympic.org/ - See also: https://hub.olympic.org/library/safe-sport/ and https://hub.olympic.org/safeguarding/resource-library/

Contact

Child protection in sport (Online course)

Organisation responsible: National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC), United Kingdom

Target groups of the practice:  Safeguarding staff, sports coaches, other volunteers

Abstract: An online introductory safeguarding course for anyone who has infrequent contact with children in a sports organisation.

Timeframe: On going

More information available at:  https://www.nspcc.org.uk/what-you-can-do/get-expert-training/child-protection-sport-online-course/

Contact

Female Athlete Health Tool: Interactive tool (e-learning module)

Organisation responsible: International Olympic Committee (IOC)

Target groups of the practice:  Athletes, athletes’ entourage members

Abstract: A module on harassment and abuse, which also considers other topics important for female athletes’ health, including injury prevention and nutrition.

Participants of this course can obtain a certificate for achieving “gold” in this course.

Timeframe: On going

More information available at:  https://www.olympicresources.com/Home/Welcome - See also: https://hub.olympic.org/library/safe-sport/ and https://hub.olympic.org/safeguarding/resource-library/

Contact

Harmful sexual behaviour in sport webinar

Organisation responsible: National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC) and Child Protection in Sport Unit (CPSU), United Kingdom

Target groups of the practice:  Safeguarding staff, sports coaches, other volunteers

Abstract: Recording of the NSPCC CPSU webinar on how organisations can minimise the risk of harmful sexual behaviour to young people involved in sport.

Timeframe: On going

More information available at:  http://thecpsu.org.uk/resource-library/2017/webinar-harmful-sexual-behaviour-in-sport/  

Contact

Play by the rules: information hub on inclusive, safe and fair sport

Organisation responsible: Australian Sports Commission, Australian Human Rights Commission, all state and territory departments of sport and recreation and equal opportunity commissions, the Australian and New Zealand Sports Law Association, the Office of the Children’s Guardian and the Anti-Discrimination Board of New South Wales.

Target groups of the practice:  Anyone involved in sport on training, resources and advice in grassroots sport

Abstract: Play by the Rules was developed in 2001 by the South Australian Department for Sport and Recreation as an interactive education and information website on discrimination, sexual harassment and child protection in sport. It has since expanded nationwide and broadened its focus to developing an inclusive, safe and fair environment in sport, but the prevention and management of sexual harassment and child abuse, especially child sexual abuse, remain central to the initiative. Play by the Rules serves as a hub for anyone involved in sport on training, resources and advice relating to, along with the other issues it focuses on, discrimination, sexual harassment and child protection in sport. Its aim is to build the capacity and capability of sports organisations to prevent and manage discrimination, harassment and child-safety issues in sport. Play by the Rules encourages sports organisations to develop and implement policies, procedures and systems on inclusion, welfare to make sport a more inclusive, safe, and fair space for all.

Timeframe: 2001 - on going

More information available at: Play by the Rules website (in English): http://www.playbytherules.net.au/  

 Detailed description of the project (in English)

Contact person: Peter Downs, Manager - Play by the Rules

Recognising and responding to harmful sexual behaviour displayed by young people (briefing and webinar)

Organisation responsible: National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC) and Child Protection in Sport Unit (CPSU), United Kingdom

Target groups of the practice:  Safeguarding staff, sports coaches, other volunteers

Abstract: This briefing provides an overview of sexually harmful behaviour in children and young people and recommends ways in which to address worrying behaviour.

Timeframe: On going

More information available at:  http://thecpsu.org.uk/resource-library/2017/sexually-harmful-behaviour-by-young-people-in-sport/  

Contact

Responding to concerns about sexual abuse (video)

Organisation responsible: National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC) and Child Protection in Sport Unit (CPSU), United Kingdom

Target groups of the practice:  Safeguarding staff, sports coaches, other volunteers

Abstract: How does your sports team or club handle concerns about sexual abuse? This video clip will help anyone involved with children and young people in sports activities including coaches, volunteer helpers, activity organisers, management committees, participants and parents.

Timeframe: On going

More information available at:  http://thecpsu.org.uk/resource-library/2013/responding-to-concerns-about-sexual-abuse/  

Contact

Sport with boundaries: the flag system

Organisation responsible: International Centre Ethics in Sports (ICES), Belgium (Flanders)

Target groups of the practice:  Professional staff and volunteers in sport organisations

Abstract: Since 2012, Flemish sport authorities have started to implement a comprehensive and cohesive policy to prevent sexual violence against minors in sport including preventive, protective and curative measures. The framework consists of 11 instruments, including a manual on how to start implementing preventive, repressive and curative measures. The framework is made available to all Flemish sport organisations. One of the key instruments is the ‘flag system’: an educational tool used to assess ‘sexually transgressive behaviour’ towards or among children and youth. The tool offers concrete guidelines and assessment criteria, which are useful when assessing and reacting to cases of sexual harassment and abuse in sport settings. The visually attractive tool uses cartoons, depicting ‘real life’ cases of accepted and unaccepted behaviours. The tool also underlines the importance of children’s sexual development and leaves room for ‘normal’, accepted sexual behaviour.

Timeframe: 2012 - on going

More information available at: The project (in Flemish): http://www.ethicsandsport.com/sport_met_grenzen

The educational resource (in Flemish): http://www.ethicsandsport.com/sport_met_grenzen/instrumenten

 Flag system promotional video (in English): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ze7pEKLAs-M

 Detailed description of the project (in English)

Contact person: Lore Vandevivere - International Centre Ethics in Sport

Understanding grooming for abuse (webinar)

Organisation responsible: National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC) and Child Protection in Sport Unit (CPSU), United Kingdom

Target groups of the practice:  Safeguarding staff, sports coaches, other volunteers

Abstract: We introduce a model that explains how grooming of children, adults and organisations contributes to the sexual abuse of children in this webinar recording.

Timeframe: On going

More information available at:  http://thecpsu.org.uk/resource-library/2015/webinar-understanding-grooming-for-abuse/  

Contact